At Least Ten Reasons to become a Portugal Global Volunteer

Are you considering becoming a Global Volunteer?  Wondering which program is best for you?  I’ve volunteered six times, in five different countries: St Lucia, Vietnam, the Cook Islands & Mexico, where I volunteered twice, and most recently Portugal.  I’ve done blog posts about four of them, describing how each program was wonderful in its own way,  and oh, so very rewarding.
Because I get sucked into all of the “top 10” lists, I decided to do one that will encourage you to consider spending two very worthwhile weeks in that fantastic part of the world known as Portugal.

  1. Highly motivated, interesting students:
    My assignment was English conversation at the Polytechnic Institute of Beja,

    My group, seven of the twenty four members of our class

    where I spent evenings chatting with adults who already had an impressive grasp of English, but wanted the opportunity to practice and to improve their pronunciation.
    Three of us taught together, breaking the students into smaller groups after the first forty five minutes of the two hour nightly class.
    Other volunteers taught at the high school,  middle schools and the prison.  Some tutored restaurant owners and staff.
    Interestingly, we each thought that WE had gotten the best assignment, which leads me to the next reason.

  2. An Incredible team Leader:
    Joe has been leading teams to Beja, Portugal for many years, and his extensive experience really shows.  He quickly sized up the 10 of us and figured out which volunteer best matched which assignment.  He’d give Match.com a run for their money, if he ever decided to get into the dating business!
    Joe knows all Beja’s historical sights, the most fun restaurants, the best excursions for the weekend, the cultural events, where you can get your laundry inexpensively done…everything you need to know to thoroughly enjoy your non-volunteering hours.

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    Our leader, Joe, in the black tee shirt, left front

  3. Interaction with the Community:
    When I say that Joe knows everybody in Beja, I’m not exaggerating.  One night, we enjoyed dinner with Beja’s mayor and councilwoman.  And yes, those are gifts the councilwoman is holding.

    What was in the bag?  Lots of local goodies, including my favorite–chocolate from the shop down the street.

  4. Lasting friendships:
    Laurie, Jeanne and I met when we volunteered in St. Lucia in 2012.   P119E0249.jpg
    Although Jeanne and I volunteered together in Mexico in 2017, this was the first time since that first meeting that I had had the pleasure of spending time with Laurie.  Having her as my “partner” at the University made it even more fun!
    The best part?  I now have SEVEN new volunteers who I would be thrilled to see on a future assignment.
  5. Shared Experiences:
    It almost felt like I was back in college.  Because we pretty much took over the first floor of the Hotel Bejense, I knew just about everyone in every room on that floor.  There was always someone to play with, just like back in the dorm.  IMG_5699Want to have a chat over a cup of tea?  No problem.  Just walk down the hall, to the breakfast room and along the way, you are sure to bump into a buddy or two.
    The hotel also had a cozy lounge, in which we gathered every night to share our experiences, before heading off to dinner.  As you can see, experiences weren’t the ONLY things we were sharing!  Our fee for Global Volunteers covers our housing, food, transportation to the work site but not wine.  Again, no problem.  We took turns purchasing wine, cheese and other snacks to make our evening meetings more enjoyable.
  6. Serpa Cheese Festival:
    Okay, so there is no guarantee that a future program will take place during the Cheese Festival.  We just happened to luck out.  (That cheese in the photo above was purchased at the festival by one of the volunteers.)
    There were LOTS of free samples of cheese AND wine AND chocolate!
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    Not only that, but we got to experience “Cante Alentejano”.  Okay, so I will never make my fortune as a videographer, but this 33 second clip will give you an idea of this very stylized art form.

  7. Evora:
    Global Volunteers are free to travel during the weekends.  Because public transportation is reliable, comfortable and inexpensive, we took the bus on Sunday to the beautiful city of Evora, spending the day enjoying all that it had to offer, like the Roman Temple,
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    the Chapel of Bones.
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    and even more music!
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  8. Beja:
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    There is so much to say about this lovely place that I devoted an entire blog post just to Beja.  Click here if you want a closer look at this delightful town.   It is so worth visiting.
  9. Lisbon
    It is also impossible to list all that Lisbon has to offer as one entry in a 10 item list.  So, Lisbon ALSO has its own post.   But here’s the best part:  It is SO easy to get from Beja to Lisbon by bus.  The bus station is just a short walk from the hotel.  I was surprised that it was so inexpensive–just 14 Euros to ride in comfort with access to free wifi.   Notice the stop in Evora.  
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  10. Venture Outside of Your Comfort Zone:
    Why not stretch your limits?  Try something new and exciting?  You may make new friends, accumulate lots of memories and experience another culture in a way that is not possible when you are just passing through, visiting the usual tourist sites.

Beja, Portugal’s Hidden Gem

Tired of touristy places? Want an “authentic”experience, where the locals are friendly, gracious and actually happy to see you? Yet ANOTHER advantage of serving as a Global Volunteer is the organization finds these places FOR you –places I would probably never would have discovered on my own.

I feel like I’ve been dropped into a magical spot. The lovely city of Beja just oozes charm. Its cobblestone streets haphazardly lead in many different directions, much worse than in Boston. Who would have thought that was even possible? Fortunately, in Beja, you can WALK everywhere–to work assignments, to dinner, for coffee, to the bus station, to its many attractions.

Streets are pretty quiet before 9 AM, but things liven up around 10:30, the “official” coffee break time.

Art is EVERYWHERE. Here are just a few examples. This sculpture is controversial. It reminds me of trees. What do YOU see?]

Even the tunnels are artistic.

In 1983, while excavating for a house’s foundation, Roman ruins were uncovered. The property’s owner was persuaded to build his house elsewhere, and voila, by 2004, this architecturally intriguing museum was created.  Okay, so in Italy you can visit all kinds of ruins, but in Beja you can walk OVER them, atop a glass floor.  For those whose eyes glaze over at the thought of another museum visit, this is the right place for you. Small, but oh so interesting.

I couldn’t figure out how to photograph the dwelling’s private bath.  Here’s my poor attempt.  Guess you’ll just have to go there.

Although the residents were aware of Pax Julia’s importance to the Romans, (Beja’s name back then), they didn’t know that the area had been inhabited much, much earlier. The museum contains artifacts dating back to 3000 BC. The Nucleo Muselogogico ( The name is almost as big as the museum) is free, as are the blue booties you wear to protect the glass floor.

Close by is the Regional Museum, which was originally a convent for women. Across the street is the theater, formerly the convent for men. The passageway that once ran between the two buildings (no doubt only used by the servants, to carry supplies back and forth), no longer exists.

The Regional Museum is the only one that charges a fee–just two Euros, and it is well worth it. In addition to all of the precious church items,

St John the Baptist

there is also a fine exhibit showing the process for restoring paintings. If seeing how St. Bartholomew was flayed is your thing, then you definitely need to find your way to the paintings room.

If instead, you are a literature buff, you can go upstairs to view the window through which Sr. Mariana gazed longingly, awaiting the return of her knight in shining armor. Yes, the author of the famous “Letters of a Portuguese Nun” lived in this very convent.

I mistakenly thought that being sent off to a convent was not a fate I would have desired. But that was BEFORE our guide pointed out its many advantages: unlike married women, who became their husband’s servants, rich girls got to bring THEIR servants WITH them to the convent. Freed from toil, they were educated, spending their days praying, reading and being waited on. I never thought of it quite like that. An additional bonus? You didn’t die in childbirth. Of course, there was always a chance you could be bricked into a wall, if you made a real good friend across the passageway, who got to know you in the biblical sense.

On the outskirts of town is the fortress (they refer to it as a castle) with the tallest tower on the Iberian peninsula. It has 198 steps and is 40 meters high (or 131 feet, but it is already on a hill, so it feels even higher).

Jeanne, Laurie and Heidi

Can you imagine trying to navigate these steps, wearing your armor while trying to dodge arrows and rocks, or whatever they were using back then?

I’ve been told you can see Spain from the top. But then, they could tell me I could see Russia from there, and I probably would have believed them.

The view from the top. Could that be Spain on the horizon?

The Hotel Bejense is a great choice if you are looking for the 4 C’s: clean, comfortable, cheap. For about $57 a night, you get a small room, with a private bath (complete with hair dryer, and towel warmers), breakfast, great Wi-Fi, a flat screenTV with many English channels, on a pedestrian walkway. Right next door a pastry shop with incredibly delicious offerings. Good thing we walk so much, because we are visiting the pastry shop at least once a day, sometimes more.

Entrance to the Hotel Bejense.

If you want to splurge and spend almost $90 per night, (off season rate ) you can always stay at the nearby Pousada de Sao Francisco, another former convent.

Four of us opted to have lunch there and to conduct our own self guided tour. I know what my sisters are thinking, so I will answer the question. YES, we WERE allowed to wander through the convent.

Speaking of food, you won’t go hungry in Beja. You have LOTS of choices, from the rather expensive (non Global Volunteer lunch at the Pousada) to the incredibly affordable and everything in between. My favorite restaurant is Les Infantes, where we were served fantastic “Tuscan Pasta Salad”. Take my word for it, if you are in Beja, you HAVE to try it.

Les Infantes, early in he evening, before it got busy.

Beja—a small city with a big heart!

 

Beja, Week One

Our first week in Beja has concluded, and what a wonderful week it was!

I’ve been asked many times about the kind of person who does a Global Volunteer project, so here’s a brief description of the 10 fantastic people with whom I’ve had the pleasure of working, complete with a visual.

Cisco (front row) is the first Australian Global Volunteer I’ve ever encountered. (He could possibly be the first Australian in Global Volunteer’s history). We all LOVE this extremely creative and talented guy. A graphic art designer by training, he has done so many other things, it is hard to believe he is only 31 years old. I suspect his Beja students are most impressed by his disc jockey experience, but I love hearing about the awards he won while working on a Disney cruise ship. He is “bloody ripper”. (Yes, Cisco is teaching me to speak Aussie).

Also in the front row is our fearless leader, Joe. It feels like EVERYBODY in Beja knows Joe. Coming here for ten years, leading two teams per year (February and September), Joe knows all of the assignments, and has done an amazing job matching us up so everyone is happy.

Joe has sampled just about every eating establishment in the area, so we are enjoying a wide variety of delicious cuisines.

Weekends are usually free time, however Joe very graciously organized a guided tour of Beja on Saturday morning, followed by an excursion to the Serpa cheese festival in the afternoon. Sunday we spent the day visiting the historic town of Evora.

My dear friend Jeanne is in row 2. Jeanne has decades of middle school experience, so she was paired with Heidi ( back row), who is a first time volunteer. Any trip with Jeanne is guaranteed to be fun. Her positive outlook on life is the gift that keeps on giving.

Next to Jeanne is Cindy, from Connecticut. She is a retired Spanish teacher, who has spent last week working in a variety of schools with Dale (last row, Heidi’s husband). Cindy has done a number of GV trips, and is returning to Queretaro, Mexico this October. For those of you who wonder if you could volunteer as a single woman, Cindy is your role model.

Laurie is between Cindy and me. Jeanne, Laurie and I all met Continue reading