Oh, To Be Rich in Ancient Sicily! 

No one knows for sure who lived in the Villa Romana del Casale.  Some think it might have been the country home of Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius; others theorize a provincial governor lived and conducted administrative duties here.

It was constructed in the middle of the 4th century AD, and owes its remarkable preservation to the mudslide that covered the villa in the 12th century.  The building remained hidden until the 1950’s excavations.

Katya, our local expert, explained that we were going to view some of the finest examples of Roman mosaics in all of Europe, with scenes ranging from Homeric escapades to depictions of daily life, at this UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Katya was excellent, and that was true of all the local guides on our trip.  We learned that our main guide, Daniel, had a choice of 4 or 5 different local guides for each site, and I have to say, he chose very well. Katya was interesting and so informative, a delight to listen to.

We began our tour by the aqueduct, which was the source of water for the baths–starting with the hot bath, and ending with the frigidarium, the cold bath.

The slaves kept the fires going in these ovens so that the baths were at the proper temperature.
I wasn’t taking notes, so don’t hold me to it, but I THINK this was the frigidarium.  Or it was something else.  Whatever.  It was impressive.


The main attraction of the villa is the floor mosaics, and they are absolutely magnificent.

Probably the most famous room, the 10  maidens are exercising, wearing the ancient version of bikinis.  And look, someone appears to have won the swimsuit competition, earning her a crown and a palm leaf to wave around.


Not quite so famous, but certainly as intriguing were these: one  example  of the many scenes of a hunt.

This woman’s clothing indicates she was from the eastern empire, possibly Muslim.  There is another mosaic of a similarly attired woman, being carried off by soldiers.   It isn’t hard to imagine what that mosaic was illustrating.

No commentary necessary for this one.


I particularly liked the depiction of the theater.  Looks like the legend of the Cyclops was being featured.

Those white squares on the mosaic–I thought someone had been littering, but no.  They were placed there intentionally to absorb moisture.


Here’s a close up of Cyclops.  I really DID like that mosaic!  Isn’t it amazing what the craftsmen were able to do with little colored stones?

One last look at the countryside and we’ll be on our way.  Our timing was fantastic.  We were leaving, just as hoards of tourists were arriving!

On the Road to Piazza Armerina 


I know.  You are all just itchin’ to find out how we are getting from point A to point B on this island.  Well, itch no more, because not only will I  TELL you, I’m also giving you the visual.  We have been traveling in comfort on this lovely bus.  There are only 16 of us, plus our guide, so we have LOTS of room to to spread out.  

The view from these huge windows has been amazing.  We definitely chose the right time to visit Sicily–the wild flowers are blooming, everything is lush and green, and the temperature has been perfect! 

We are all so grateful that Marco, our bus driver,  is manouvering along these winding, VERY narrow roads, up and down the hillsides.   All we had to do is sit back, relax and take it all in.  

Once again, we will be time traveling, all the way back to Ancient Greece.  I don’t know why, but I just got a flash back to Mr. Peabody and his boy, Sherman, of the Rocky and Bullwinkle Show.  (“Every dog should have a boy”. God, I loved that show! ) How sad that so much of my knowledge of history, at least what stuck,  came from cartoons and Walt Disney!  But I digress. 

When we arrived at the Valley of the Temples, we were greeted by another Marco, our guide for the site.  An archaeologist,  he came equipped with maps, diagrams, and an abundance of enthusiasm.  

Sadly, the site had been picked clean by those successive waves of conquerors, so it was difficult to extract much information about the lifestyle of the original Greek inhabitants of Akragas (as the area was once known) from artifacts, bones, shards, etc.  

Fortunately, though, eight Greek temples remain at this UNESCO site, all built between 510 and 430 BC.  The best preserved temple, called “Concordia” by the non-archaeologists, (because the archaeologists didn’t have sufficient info to determine the correct names of the temples) was saved from being scavenged by the locals because it was transformed into a church by the Normans.  Walls were built between the pillars, and the entrance was changed, then at some point (and yeah, I forgot what Marco said.  Sorry!) it was all changed back.


From the valley, you can see the modern city of Agrigento, just beyond Greek temple F (the archaeologists’ name for Concordia. ) 

What Marco COULD tell us was that these arches were once the entrance to Greek tombs, that were later repurposed by the Normans for shelter, with the actual grave used as a manger for their animals.  The Greeks dug shallow graves — only about a foot and a half deep– and covered the hole with rocks.  Who knows what the Norman’s did with the remains they found when they moved those rocks! 


My favorite part of the site, however, was this incredible sculpture of Icarus, who fell from the skies because he flew too close to the sun.  Clearly, HE hadn’t been under water for 2,000 years!  Also clear was that he was a modern addition to the site.


After our tour, it was time for lunch at this lovely private home.  


You’d think we would have figured it out by now.  What we THOUGHT was the lunch, was actually just the antipasto, followed by several other courses.  We have concluded that we need to get much better at pacing ourselves!  But if the food wasn’t enough, there was yet another surprise in store for us:  The owner’s grandfather had been a renown craftsman, creating donkey carts that were truly works of art.  

The paintings on the sides of the carts were of historical events, like this one depicting the assassination of Julius Caesar.


Even the spokes on the wheels were intricately carved.  


Here’s our hostess, who also functioned as guide, cook and server.

These magical interludes are a big reason that Mike and I travel with OAT.  We NEVER would have been able to arrange for some of these fascinating encounters on our own!  

By now, we were completely sated with food and culture, ready for our one night stay at Vecchia Masseria in Piazza Amerina.  

And yes, it really WAS that beautiful.  Another agritourismo, in a pastoral setting with delicious,  locally sourced food.  Life is good.  

Sicilian Celebration

Mike and I stopped giving each other “stuff” years ago.  We already have more than enough future yard sale items.  No more birthday, anniversary, Valentine’s, Christmas or Groundhog’s Day presents for us. Instead, we mark life’s milestones by making memories, mostly through traveling.  Refusing to succumb to the tyranny of the calendar, we are free to celebrate whatever we want, whenever we want.  If we happen to be traveling during an anniversary or birthday month, well then, that’s just a bonus.  THIS year is one of those bonus years.

We will be in Sicily during May, our anniversary month,  hoisting our glasses to toast 41 years of wedded bliss.  Okay, full disclosure.  Those years haven’t ALL been blissful (my sisters would add ” especially for poor Mike” ) but on the whole, it’s been pretty darn great!

We will be embarking on an OAT (Overseas Adventure Travel) trip with our good friends, Shirley and Owen.  Two years ago we spent  two weeks wandering through Tuscany and the Amalfi coast with OAT’s sister company, Grand Circle.  They had never been on an organized tour before, but had such a wonderful time, it was not difficult to persuade them to come along again. What’s especially exciting is that Shirley’s grandfather hails from a small village two hours from Palermo.  She and Owen plan to make their way to the village on one of our “free” days.  

This is what our OAT itinerary looks like.  As you can see, we are covering quite a lot of ground.

We will be staying for three nights in four of the cities: Palermo, Mazara, Ragusa and Catania, with a single night in Piazza Armerina.  At the end of the OAT tour, the four of us will head to Malta.  From Catania, we will fly to Valetta and will use that as our base during our five days in Malta.  

As usual, I’ve been learning the history of the places we’ll be visiting, and I have to tell you, theose poor inhabitants of Sicily did not have an easy time of it.  Here’s the Cliff’s Note version:  There was a lot of fighting and conquering going on–with Greeks, Romans, Carthaginians, Arabs, Normans, and Spaniards taking turns raping, pillaging, plundering and selling inhabitants into slavery.   Sicily isn’t at the bottom of “the boot” for nothing.  It sure got kicked around a lot!

Augustus, Hannibal, Constantine, Archimedes, and several Williams, Charles and Fredericks all had starring roles in Sicily’s narrative.  (Don’t you just hate it when the rulers all have the same name and you need to remember their numbers?  At least for the Williams there was William the Bad and William the Good.)  Throw in a couple of popes, an emperor or two, some knights plus a couple of earthquakes and an active volcano and you are guaranteed some interesting stories with even better ruins.

What fascinates me  more than the political history is the mythology.  Unlike the kings, whose moms sorely lacked imagination when it came time to name their offspring, the mythological figures have double names:  Zeus and Jupiter, Ulysses and Odysseus, Venus and Aphrodite.  So confusing to an already confused American, but that’s what happens when Greek and Roman cultures share the same territory.  

For now, that’s all you need to know about Sicily’s history.  More will be forthcoming, and there’s always the possibility of a pop quiz or two.

Preview of coming attractions:

  • Lots of cathedrals, temples, palaces, amphitheaters plus a dancing satyr
  • Eye popping mosaics, fit for an emperor, like maybe Marcus Aurelius?
  • an educational encounter with a member of the Mafia
  • a cooking class (hope we do better than the last time we tried this!)
  • “Come with me to the kasbah, where we will make ” whatever they make there.  (If you got that reference, you are probably as old as I am!) 
  • wine tasting at a Marsala vineyard
  • a day in the life of a Sicilian dairy farm family
  • a visit to Mt Etna to watch the volcano do its thing

Please join us for some armchair traveling.  I’ll be posting whenever wi-fi and my energy levels allow.  But I have to warn you, I plan to be toasting those 41 years a whole LOT!  Expect typos.  

Oh yeah, about that photo at the top of this post.  It’s actually Sorrento, from our 2015 trip.  I just wanted a little visual to start us all off.