At Least Ten Reasons to become a Portugal Global Volunteer

Are you considering becoming a Global Volunteer?  Wondering which program is best for you?  I’ve volunteered six times, in five different countries: St Lucia, Vietnam, the Cook Islands & Mexico, where I volunteered twice, and most recently Portugal.  I’ve done blog posts about four of them, describing how each program was wonderful in its own way,  and oh, so very rewarding.
Because I get sucked into all of the “top 10” lists, I decided to do one that will encourage you to consider spending two very worthwhile weeks in that fantastic part of the world known as Portugal.

  1. Highly motivated, interesting students:
    My assignment was English conversation at the Polytechnic Institute of Beja,

    My group, seven of the twenty four members of our class

    where I spent evenings chatting with adults who already had an impressive grasp of English, but wanted the opportunity to practice and to improve their pronunciation.
    Three of us taught together, breaking the students into smaller groups after the first forty five minutes of the two hour nightly class.
    Other volunteers taught at the high school,  middle schools and the prison.  Some tutored restaurant owners and staff.
    Interestingly, we each thought that WE had gotten the best assignment, which leads me to the next reason.

  2. An Incredible team Leader:
    Joe has been leading teams to Beja, Portugal for many years, and his extensive experience really shows.  He quickly sized up the 10 of us and figured out which volunteer best matched which assignment.  He’d give Match.com a run for their money, if he ever decided to get into the dating business!
    Joe knows all Beja’s historical sights, the most fun restaurants, the best excursions for the weekend, the cultural events, where you can get your laundry inexpensively done…everything you need to know to thoroughly enjoy your non-volunteering hours.

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    Our leader, Joe, in the black tee shirt, left front

  3. Interaction with the Community:
    When I say that Joe knows everybody in Beja, I’m not exaggerating.  One night, we enjoyed dinner with Beja’s mayor and councilwoman.  And yes, those are gifts the councilwoman is holding.

    What was in the bag?  Lots of local goodies, including my favorite–chocolate from the shop down the street.

  4. Lasting friendships:
    Laurie, Jeanne and I met when we volunteered in St. Lucia in 2012.   P119E0249.jpg
    Although Jeanne and I volunteered together in Mexico in 2017, this was the first time since that first meeting that I had had the pleasure of spending time with Laurie.  Having her as my “partner” at the University made it even more fun!
    The best part?  I now have SEVEN new volunteers who I would be thrilled to see on a future assignment.
  5. Shared Experiences:
    It almost felt like I was back in college.  Because we pretty much took over the first floor of the Hotel Bejense, I knew just about everyone in every room on that floor.  There was always someone to play with, just like back in the dorm.  IMG_5699Want to have a chat over a cup of tea?  No problem.  Just walk down the hall, to the breakfast room and along the way, you are sure to bump into a buddy or two.
    The hotel also had a cozy lounge, in which we gathered every night to share our experiences, before heading off to dinner.  As you can see, experiences weren’t the ONLY things we were sharing!  Our fee for Global Volunteers covers our housing, food, transportation to the work site but not wine.  Again, no problem.  We took turns purchasing wine, cheese and other snacks to make our evening meetings more enjoyable.
  6. Serpa Cheese Festival:
    Okay, so there is no guarantee that a future program will take place during the Cheese Festival.  We just happened to luck out.  (That cheese in the photo above was purchased at the festival by one of the volunteers.)
    There were LOTS of free samples of cheese AND wine AND chocolate!
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    Not only that, but we got to experience “Cante Alentejano”.  Okay, so I will never make my fortune as a videographer, but this 33 second clip will give you an idea of this very stylized art form.

  7. Evora:
    Global Volunteers are free to travel during the weekends.  Because public transportation is reliable, comfortable and inexpensive, we took the bus on Sunday to the beautiful city of Evora, spending the day enjoying all that it had to offer, like the Roman Temple,
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    the Chapel of Bones.
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    and even more music!
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  8. Beja:
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    There is so much to say about this lovely place that I devoted an entire blog post just to Beja.  Click here if you want a closer look at this delightful town.   It is so worth visiting.
  9. Lisbon
    It is also impossible to list all that Lisbon has to offer as one entry in a 10 item list.  So, Lisbon ALSO has its own post.   But here’s the best part:  It is SO easy to get from Beja to Lisbon by bus.  The bus station is just a short walk from the hotel.  I was surprised that it was so inexpensive–just 14 Euros to ride in comfort with access to free wifi.   Notice the stop in Evora.  
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  10. Venture Outside of Your Comfort Zone:
    Why not stretch your limits?  Try something new and exciting?  You may make new friends, accumulate lots of memories and experience another culture in a way that is not possible when you are just passing through, visiting the usual tourist sites.

Is Lisbon on Your Bucket List?

If Lisbon isn’t on your bucket list, you need to get it on there.  Right now.

Why? Great food, amazing history, beautiful sights, wonderful side trips, friendly people, affordable hotels, great public transportation, and relatively painless flights–what more could you want?

Our stay in Lisbon was just long enough to convince us that we have to return to spend more time taking in everything that it has to offer.

Although the weather wasn’t perfect during our visit, it certainly was better than what we are experiencing today, the day after Easter, here in New Jersey!  But then, snow days are made for us retirees to look through our travel photos and blog about our sojourn.   Am I right?

Because we were on a Grand Circle Tour (Sister company of Overseas Adventure) our time was planned for us, with a guided tour that included Lisbon’s more popular sights.

The Parque of Eduardo VII was a great vantage point, offering a panoramic view of the city and the Tagus River.

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Of course, it wouldn’t be a European city tour unless you stopped at a cathedral.  This one, at the Jeronimos Monastery, happens to be  Vasco de Gama’s final resting spot.  It is also the place where explorers and sailors went to pray before heading off on their journeys to the edge of the earth.

To honor those seamen, the cathedral roof was designed to resemble sailors ropes and knots.  You can’t tell from the photo–you’ll just have to trust me on that one.

At the end of our visit, JuanJo, our tour guide, surprised us with a special treat, the custard tart for which Portugal is famous.  This particular bakery is supposedly the one that does it best because it was the sole recipient of a super secret recipe, developed by monks. IMG_6286This recipe is as closely guarded as the coca cola formula, or so we were told.  I didn’t have the heart to share that I had equally delicious custard tarts from a bakery in Beja.  I was told the nuns developed THEIR recipe to use up egg yokes.  Why?  Because they used the egg whites to starch their colors and headgear, so had a mountain of excess yokes they didn’t want to waste.  IMG_6287  On our drive to Belem Tower, we passed this street art, made entirely of garbage.  The raccoon’s eyes are discarded tires!

Sorry the photo is so pixilated–it was shot from the bus, with my iPhone.  But I hope you can see that this is a beautiful and imaginative piece.  The artist, Artur Bordalo, has created many murals throughout Lisbon.  What I didn’t realize was that I had seen his work already, in beautiful Beja.  Remember the rooster from my earlier post?  Check out Bordalo’s signature at the bottom right.  I loved that rooster even BEFORE I learned it was constructed out of cast off materials.

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The Belem Tower was built in the early 1500’s near the mouth of the Tagus river to defend Lisbon from the bad guys.  Really?  THIS is what their fortress looks like?  All decorative and ornate?  It looks more like Cinderella’s Castle than Fort Apache!

The second landmark on this side of the Targus River is the Monument to the Discoveries, created in 1960 to commemorate the 500th anniversary of the death of Prince Henry the Navigator.

IMG_6300What is really cool is the pavement in front of the monument, a mosaic map of the world, complete with ships and mermaids.

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Climbing the sides of the monument are important Portuguese historical figures, like Vasco da Gama, Magellan and of course, Prince Henry at the front.  St Francis Xavier made it onto the monument, but not into my photo.

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Across the Tagus you can see what looks like a cross.  It is actually a statue of Christ, with arms outspread like the one in Brazil.  IMG_6340
Also notice the bridge.  Remind you of any place in the USA?

After hitting many of Lisbon’s “must see” attractions in the morning, we had the afternoon to wander.  Our hotel, the Mundial,  was ideally located near cafes, shops, restaurants, and beautiful squares, perfect for people watching while munching on one of those delightful pastries.

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Believe it or not, this square is perfectly flat.  Those “waves” are a pavement optical illusion!

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Loved the sand sculptures

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School outing, maybe?

Dinner that evening was in a former Moorish palace that was briefly a casino before becoming the restaurant– La Casa Do Alentejo.  We dined in the gorgeous private room on the third floor.

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Okay, so I had a little wine before taking this picture, but I at least I DID get the decorative ceiling and the mirrors on the walls!

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The second floor was beautiful too, with tiled walls

The next day we visited the Royal Palace in Sintra.  Sintra is a lovely little city an easy day trip from Lisbon.

IMG_6359As one would expect, the Royal Palace was filled with beautiful art and treasures of all kinds.  I particularly liked this chandelier.  Hard to believe, but my iPhone 7 took a better photo than my Panasonic Lumix.

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The other unique item that caught my eye was this painting.  That sure looks like a negligee that he’s (our guide said it was St. John the Baptist–but who knows) either wearing or holding in front of him, and is that a toy horse?  If not, then what is it?  This has to be one of the strangest paintings I’ve seen in a LOOOONG time!

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On our way back to Lisbon, we stopped at Cascais, a lovely seaside town, which is even closer to  Lisbon, and is serviced by frequent trains.  We arrived just in time for the heavens to open in a colossal downpour, but no biggie.  We were with 36 new friends, so several of us ducked into a restaurant where we enjoyed delicious roasted chicken, great wine and even better companionship.  No photos of our bedraggled, sodden group will ever be posted.  I promise!

Because I had spent two weeks with Global Volunteers before joining the tour, I was able to visit Evora, another great site about an hour by bus from Lisbon.  But I’ll save that for another post.

Portugal in general and Lisbon in particular will not disappoint!